M888 Detection Delay Question

I went out in front of my M888 today and put out some more attractant. My camera only took one pic of me although I stood there moving around in front of camera for 3 minutes or so. I can't understand how my camera only took one pic when I've got it set on 1 shot 30 second delay. I assume it would have taken at least 3 pics.

Also when I have deer in front of my camera feeding I'm not getting a couple pics a minute.

Is there something I'm not understanding regarding the PIR sensor and what it takes to trigger the camera?

Comments

  • @UTGrad It's possible you're running into an Ambient temperature thing. I'm not sure where you are, but here in Birmingham it's quite warm!

    Basically the way the PIR works is that it detects IR energy by watching for changes in its field of view. Imagine the detection angle of the sensor like a waffle. Each pocket in the waffle is a separate 'field' the sensor is monitoring. Whenever a heat source that is +- a few degrees ambient crosses from one pocket into another, it generates an electrical signal.

    What this means is that you have to have adequate movement that breaks one of the field lines of the sensor with something that is +- a few degrees ambient temperature. There are a couple of other factors, such as speed of the object that breaks the field and relative size as seen by the sensor. Generally speaking you need somewhere around +- 10-25 degrees from ambient to break a zone for the camera to recognize it as a 'good' trigger.

    The body temperature of a deer ranges anywhere from 98 (just like us) to about 103, so if it's a scorcher outside there is a decent chance that you might miss some triggers - especially if they are milling around and moving slowly.

  • @Moultrie_Ninjaneer said:
    @UTGrad It's possible you're running into an Ambient temperature thing. I'm not sure where you are, but here in Birmingham it's quite warm!

    Basically the way the PIR works is that it detects IR energy by watching for changes in its field of view. Imagine the detection angle of the sensor like a waffle. Each pocket in the waffle is a separate 'field' the sensor is monitoring. Whenever a heat source that is +- a few degrees ambient crosses from one pocket into another, it generates an electrical signal.

    What this means is that you have to have adequate movement that breaks one of the field lines of the sensor with something that is +- a few degrees ambient temperature. There are a couple of other factors, such as speed of the object that breaks the field and relative size as seen by the sensor. Generally speaking you need somewhere around +- 10-25 degrees from ambient to break a zone for the camera to recognize it as a 'good' trigger.

    The body temperature of a deer ranges anywhere from 98 (just like us) to about 103, so if it's a scorcher outside there is a decent chance that you might miss some triggers - especially if they are milling around and moving slowly.

    I'm right up I-65 in Franklin, TN just south of Nashville about 20 miles so yeah its hot! Thanks MN.

  • Interesting you pointed this out MN cause at a certain time each morning the tree in the center of the frame reflects the sun. Maybe this is what causes the camera's confusion:

  • @UTGrad Absolutely. As far as the camera is concerned that entire area is 'bright', so anything moving in-front of it has to be sufficiently brighter to cause it to trigger!

  • Yep you can see me coming into the frame on the left and didn't get anymore pics of me after that BUT that tree was lit up.
  • For a week or so, between 3:30 and 4:30 every day we were getting what we called "shadow shots" due to the sun blaring down on the ground and trees.

    I will say, it makes me optimistic about the performance in fall and winter.

  • edited September 2016

    A PIR has to see a Rapid Temp Change in the Field of View otherwise it won't trigger the Game Camera. being it is warm / hot out maybe but I get pictures / videos all day long when the wind blows tree limbs so I hope it works better for you when it gets cooler or you can hope it does... Some are too sensitive and false trigger... It depends on the model and the year... Some have an adjust as to low, medium or high while others do not...

    Good Luck...
    Newaygo101

  • @UTGrad said:

    @Moultrie_Ninjaneer said:
    @UTGrad It's possible you're running into an Ambient temperature thing. I'm not sure where you are, but here in Birmingham it's quite warm!

    Basically the way the PIR works is that it detects IR energy by watching for changes in its field of view. Imagine the detection angle of the sensor like a waffle. Each pocket in the waffle is a separate 'field' the sensor is monitoring. Whenever a heat source that is +- a few degrees ambient crosses from one pocket into another, it generates an electrical signal.

    What this means is that you have to have adequate movement that breaks one of the field lines of the sensor with something that is +- a few degrees ambient temperature. There are a couple of other factors, such as speed of the object that breaks the field and relative size as seen by the sensor. Generally speaking you need somewhere around +- 10-25 degrees from ambient to break a zone for the camera to recognize it as a 'good' trigger.

    The body temperature of a deer ranges anywhere from 98 (just like us) to about 103, so if it's a scorcher outside there is a decent chance that you might miss some triggers - especially if they are milling around and moving slowly.

    I'm right up I-65 in Franklin, TN just south of Nashville about 20 miles so yeah its hot! Thanks MN.

    Interesting insight on how the operation of the PIR.

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